Morocco is a thriving tourist hub of Northern Africa. However, due to climate and geography some travelers often are unprepared to travel here. From deserts to bustling medinas, Morocco travel is enthralling yet challenging. Our Morocco travel tips are going to help you pack for your trip and enjoy your experience while there, instead of getting stuck in tourist traps and wasting time on worrying rather than enjoying your tour.

Weather & clothing

ClothingWhat to pack and when to travel
The best time to visit Morocco is in spring or fall. Summers might get unbearably hot and winters can be chilly, especially in mountains. One more important factor to consider is Ramadan, as many shops and cafes are closed during day (check Ramadan schedule). When it comes to clothing, pack something light to wear during daytime and remember to have something to wear when visiting religious sights.

Money & ATMs

MoneySituation with currencies & cash
The official currency of Morocco is Dirham (MAD or Dhs). It can be purchased at any local currency exchange office for USD or EUR. ATMs in major cities are also in abundance and you can easily withdraw local money from your debit card (Visa, MasterCard, Cirrus, etc.). Paying by cards is also popular and cards are accepted widely. However, if you're at a downtown bazaar, make sure to have some cash on you.

1 USD = 9.7 MAD

Restaurant prices

MealAverage cost of meals
One of the best things about traveling to Morocco are prices! Cost of a light snack is around $5. A fully-fledged mid-range restaurant dinner for two would cost from $20-$30. Traditional local cuisine is worth sampling and one dish you will encounter anywhere is a tajine - a stew that is a historically Berber dish named after the earthenware pot in which it is cooked.

Tipping etiquette

TipsGiving tips to guides & drivers
Tipping and bargaining is quintessential part of Moroccan national charisma, lifestyle and commerce. 5-10% tip is always appropriate. While restaurants and cafes have fixed prices, remember to always bargain when visiting small local shops and markets. You will be surprised how far a good bargaining can take you here! Tips to guides and drivers are also appropriate but are voluntary.

Language

LanguageHow to blend in with the locals
Morocco has two official languages - modern Arabic and Berber - and a bunch of others spoken widely in some areas. If you aren't savvy in either Arabic or Berber, do not despair! French is spoken by almost everyone. English is also emerging in popularity and you can easily communicate in it with hotel and restaurant staff. One more popular option - especially in the North of Morocco - is Spanish.

Electricity

ElectricityCharging your phone & camera
Regular European electrical plugs are used in all of Morocco, so you just need to take a European outlet converter with you.

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